There’s Another Baby at the Barn

There’s Another Baby at the Barn

Our blog post of March 10 reported on a spate of four babies, then we spent three weeks waiting and watching for mares to foal.  We had lots of guests at the B&B and the babies on board were developing as they should, and they saw the farrier for the first time. It’s interesting to watch the farrier visits because we get to see each foal out of the stall, walking in the shed row so that the farrier can evaluate his or her walk.  He’s looking to see if there are any issues with the way the baby’s hoofs hit the ground with each step.  A good farrier is an artist, who can help the baby’s development by the way he trims his or her feet.  If you haven’t noticed by now, I’ll remind you that there is a lot of artistry, knowledge and experience that goes into raising successful racehorses.  Then we just have to pray for an equal amount of (good) LUCK. Meanwhile, we watched Dancing Band and Miss Dixie Rose (who were both due about March 12) watch us back, while waddling in and out of the barn each morning and afternoon.  Finally on April 1st, when some of you were playing practical jokes on each other, Dancing Band decided to deliver a nice Orb colt just after dinner at 9:15 PM. Quick reminder that Orb is the royally bred (by Malibu Moon, out of a mare descended from a sister to the great racemare Ruffian) Bourbon County colt foaled and raised across the road from us at Claiborne Farm…the winner of what I like to call the “Bourbon...
Grade One Winner!

Grade One Winner!

I know this is the fourth time in the last five blog posts that my headline has ended with an exclamation mark, but having a Grade One winner just demands an exclamation mark. Actually WC Racing had the honors of not only owning, but breeding, the new Grade One winner — DENMAN’S CALL.   But WC Racing has always included Rosecrest in all their great moments, and now we are Team Rosecrest / Wilshire Farm.  So all the more reason to celebrate. Denman’s Call won the Grade I Triple Bend Handicap at Santa Anita on March 11.  He made a “bold move on the turn”, collared favorite MASOCHISTIC at the head of the stretch, took the lead at the eighth pole and drew away to a length win.  Wooooohoooo! You may remember the name as Denman’s Call figured prominently on the West Coast Kentucky Derby Trail last year, running third in the San Vicente S.-G2 behind two little horses named NYQUIST and EXAGGERATOR before running sixth in the Santa Anita Derby-G1. He has been running in top company, but this was not only his first G1 win, but first stakes win.  He has won or placed in six of his eight career starts, so the future looks bright.   Less than one percent of the horses born in North America in a given year win a G1 race, and with all WC Racing’s good horses, this is their first G1 winner since GOLDENCENTS,  and it is sooooooo much more special when you bred AND own the winner…. so we’re pumped. Actually, we had an exciting race the day before that of Denman’s Call, as well....
Full Baby Mode

Full Baby Mode

We have FOUR new babies at Rosecrest Farm, and each arrival was a little different…. The first recent newcomer was Yonehay 17. His mama (Yonehay, in case you’re new to this baby horse parlance) was in NO hurry to have her baby this year. The average gestation period for a mare is 340 days.  She decided that was not enough and waited an additional 26 days before delivering her long legged colt by It’s My Lucky Day. (Remember him from the 2013 Kentucky Derby, when he was one of five Bourbon County-foaled starters in that year’s Derby???) Yonehay was very considerate and delivered February 20 at 10:15 PM, which allowed us to have a full night’s sleep.  I said he had “long legs”.  Maybe I should have said “long, long, long legs”!  They were so long that he kept getting them tangled when trying to stand.  For those of you who have never seen a foal stand up, let me try to explain.  There are many miracles that occur with a birth, and one of them is standing.   Foals seem to have an instinct to extend their front legs ahead of them, so they can push up with their backside.  Then, with the front legs stretched, they attempt to balance of four wobbly legs. Well this boy kept crossing those front legs, making it utterly impossible for him to stand.  Chuck would uncross them, and then this young boy could stand.  But the next time he got up, he wanted to cross them again.  Sooooo through the night, he was very happy to have assistance from Chris (our nightwatchman)  so he could...
It’s Baby Time!

It’s Baby Time!

We’ve started the year with two fabulous GOLDENCENTS foals. I know some of you are thinking I’m a little biased… and you would be soooo correct :-). But if you think I’m a little excited about our babies, it’s nothing compared to their actual owners WC Racing (Glen and Josh). So the first mare to foal was Diamond Stilettos on February 5 at 1:27 AM.  This is her first foal and we all wondered what kind of Mama she was going to be. Diamond Stilettos retired off the track in California in the summer of 2015.  After she was bred to Goldencents last spring and progressed normally, I noticed at about 7 months, she started looking at her belly a lot.  Her look was sort of, “What is going ON with my body?  It’s changing and I’m feeling some strange things!”  The last month she had really bloomed and actually waddled in and out of the barn each day. Well, for her first time foaling she was great… pretty much laid down, rolled a couple of times and voila… a feisty Goldencents filly!  Mama kissed her nose and, like most moms, thought this was the most precious foal of all time.  Diamond Stilettos was immediately attentive, and the filly was loving and easy to handle.  Wellllllll, maybe I should say she is a “handful, but in a good way”.  Because of freezing rain she was two days old when she got out of the barn. Chuck was surprised when she needed very little encouragement to walk out to the paddock.  In fact, she went ahead of her Mom at a...
Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

The last few weeks have presented a wide range of emotions. (Have you noticed that seems to be the norm on a horse farm???) Three weeks ago, on January 1, 2017, we celebrated about 50 birthdays on the farm.  It was a cold and grey day, which did not make for many good photo opps, but as I went around wishing all “Happy Birthday”, the horses young and old were not deterred by the grey day.  They enjoyed the extra attention they were getting. I did have what I considered to be some bad news to share with CHARLEY’S HOPE… that her daughter SASSY ROSE had been claimed the day before at Santa Anita, and was no longer part of the Rosecrest Family.  Sassy ran third in the race, almost having to split a deadheat with her former pasturemate PISTOL PACKIN ROSE.  But Sassy got her nose down for third over Pistol Packin Rose. I told Rose Dela Troienne, dam of Pistol Packin Rose, that her daughter broke well but hung back in 7th place until the stretch when jockey Flavien Prat said she suddenly kicked into a new gear and came running.  Good effort… just a little late. The granddams of both fillies are also on the farm, so I had to tell them all about the race, too… they all like to be kept informed! The yearlings turning two-years-old are ready to begin training.  Four of them are going to Webb Carroll in SC.  Actually two shipped a week ago.  Max was supposed to go with them, but decided he was not shipping that day.  Some of you...
Willie:  New Kid on the Block

Willie: New Kid on the Block

I hear lots of people say that a horse doesn’t know what they sold for. Well, I might have to disagree. If a horse goes through the ring and if they are listening to the auctioneer, they hear that final bid amount over and over and over before the gavel hits. But, as I said, the horse must be paying attention – which is not always the case.  Sometimes they are distracted by what’s going on around them, and there is a LOT going on around them.  The auctioneer is doing his rhythmical chant and making a lot of noise, but there are also all those people looking at them, and then you  have the people not bidding, but visiting with each other…as the horse wonders, “Why aren’t they bidding on me?  Don’t they know I’m going to be a winner?  I’m the next Big One!”  But then there’s that strange person standing off to the side, gesturing wildly while telling a story to the small crowd around him and the horse wishes he could hear that tall horse tale. Sorry, I digress.  Let’s get back to the main character of this story….”Willie”. His actual moniker until named is “Summer Soiree 16”.  That means he is the 2016 foal out of Grade I stakes winner SUMMER SOIREE (by War Front).  He is sired by WILL TAKE CHARGE, and is from Will Take Charge’s first crop.  So even before this weanling stepped into the sales ring, he had heard all about his pedigree, including that Will Take Charge earned $3,924,648 in 21 starts and was the son of Broodmare of the Year TAKE CHARGE...